Breast Feeding Education with Dr. Jack Newman

Dr. Newman shared some of his  breast feeding wisdom and experiences for a full day at the Nursing Mother’s Council Conference. As a certified lactation counselor I am energized and passionate about supporting new breast feeding parents so they can  achieve their breast feeding goals. All you have to do is reach out for support!

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AAP Has New Safe Infant Sleep Recommendations

New parents are very tired and the option of a partner or other help may not be available. Knowing the safest options for safe infant sleep and what to avoid is important.

“If you are feeding your baby and think that there’s even the slightest possibility that you may fall asleep, feed your baby on your bed, rather than a sofa or cushioned chair,” said Lori Feldman-Winter, MD, FAAP, member of the Task Force on SIDS and co-author of the report.

AAP Announces New Safe Sleep Recommendations to Protect Against SIDS, Sleep-Related Infant Deaths

 

 

 

Did you know that infant formula in powdered form is NOT sterile?

Friday Fact!!

Powdered infant formula is NOT a sterile product. This is particularly important for infants at high risk. There are organisms that can be found in powdered infant formula including Salmonella and E. Sakazakii. Not appealing!

What should you do? You should BOIL the water that you use to mix the formula and do not allow it to cool below 158 degrees F before mixing. This hot water kills any bacteria present in the powdered formula.

THEN cool the mixed formula to body temperature BEFORE you feed the infant or immediately store it in the refrigerator.

A clean water source is important and luckily in the United States that is not usually a problem.

Remember, Whether tap, bottled or infant water the boiling of the water is to sterilize the Powdered Infant Formula!

The World Health Organization supports this!

http://www.who.int/foodsafety/publications/powdered-infant-formula/en/

 

Gay Dads Need Doulas, Too

Mamma’s Instincts is Postpartum Doula support that embraces your unique family~
“Whether you’re starting (or expanding) your family via birth, surrogacy, or adoption, the first few months of a baby’s life are both challenging and joyful for ALL parents. Being lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and/or queer doesn’t magically improve one’s ability to cope with sleep deprivation, blowout diaper changes, an inconsolable infant, or postpartum depression. However, being prepared with the right support team in place…….”
That Doula Guy says it all clearly……..

That Doula Guy

rainbow-dadAs a postpartum doula supporting LGBTQ families, and a queer-identified man myself, I often feel that my community gets left out of the early parenting support world.

Labor support is usually tailored to the gestational or birthing parent, as it should be. But babies come into this world with all different types of parents ready to welcome them, including eager mommies/daddies/abbas/mamas/papas/babas/zazas/spunkles, etc. Why not make the support that’s offered just as diverse as the many different types of families out there?

Postpartum support needs to be culturally competent. Families who don’t fit the mold of your average two-parent heterosexual household deserve sensitive care that’s attuned to the whole family’s wellbeing. If you’ve just done the exhausting work of birthing a baby, the last thing you should have to worry about is whether your doula will need a primer on terminology or “trans 101” in order to effectively serve your family. If you’ve…

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Let’s Not Forget That Partners Are Also Transitioning When A Baby Arrives

The following is a quote taken from DONA, Doulas of North America, in regards to new dads. I would like to remind families that all partners (not just the “traditional roles” often referred to) are adjusting to a new baby’s arrival. Partners can also benefit from postpartum doula support when their families and responsibilities grow. 

“There are many ways in which the doula’s support benefits the father. Research has proven that mothers and babies have an easier transition with support. However, fathers, experiencing great life transitions of their own, may not be able to be the primary provider of this support. Fathers are redefining their roles; they may also be adjusting to sleep deprivation, financial pressure and other stressors, as well. The doula’s support is for the father as much as the mother or children. A sympathetic ear, source of encouragement, gentle educator and friend is something from which we could all benefit throughout our lives. The postpartum doula provides all of these during this defining life experience.”

Jacquie Procopio   ~Postpartum doula support that embraces your unique family.

 

What about infant hunger cues?

How can you tell if the baby is hungry? Let’s go over infant hunger cues.   Early Hunger Cues

Early hunger cues happen when the baby is in light active sleep. The eyes will start moving as if dreaming, lips start moving, early waking up time to alert awake quiet state, and the rooting reflex activates searching for the breast. These all signal a fantastic opportunity to offer the baby the breast or bottle while he is calm.

If these cues are not recognized then the mid hunger cues will kick in. In this phase the infant will have increased body movement, stretching, putting hands to mouth (or anything that grazes the lips), and very active rooting in desperate search of nourishment on any person that is holding them. This is also a great time to offer the breast or bottle without further delay!

Sometimes all of these cues are missed even by the most attentive parents. It is important to note that every infant has their own threshold before they get to the late hunger cues. At this point he is quite agitated, frantically rooting side to side, crying and red faced. This is not an ideal time to put the baby to breast and have a good latch. Giving a bottle to the baby in this state may cause excess air intake resulting in gas or regurgitation. Calming a baby that has reached this state is often necessary before a successful feed can take place.  Skin to skin, sucking on a parents pinky finger with or without milk on it, rocking and changing rooms can all help to calm.

Waiting until the late hunger cues as a routine for feedings is not ideal. It can result in feeding and attachment problems as well as stress for both baby and parents. While new parents get to know their infants putting the baby to breast often will develop a good milk supply as well as create a strong bond and secure attachment. Bottle feeding with love and attention will nurture bonding and attachment.

Postpartum Doula support will help new parents to navigate hunger cues as well as the complete transition period of a new baby during the first days, weeks, and months. Contact me if you would like to arrange a visit!

Jacquie

Mamma’s Instincts,                                                                Postpartum Doula support that embraces your unique family~